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The elbow is viewed as the most straightforward joint to exam with the cases usually being specific so if you get an elbow short case, you should breathe a sigh of relief. We don't share this view as many candidates will perform very poorly with an elbow case that was relatively routine and clear cut.

Look on the medial aspect of elbow whilst the patient actively moves the elbow through the flexion/extension range. On occasions we can see a ‘subluxing ulnar nerve over the medial epicondyle’ and if supported by clinical symptomatology further assessment of ulnar nerve dysfunction would be valuable - snapping elbow. The triceps tendon could also give rise to the clicky elbow but this is more evident when actively extending the elbow against resistance, in contrast to a subluxing ulnar nerve which happens when passively flexing and extending the elbow.

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QUESTION 1 OF 3

A student presents to clinic 3 months post injury. Their main complaint is elbow clicking when getting out of a chair.
Which structure is most commonly injured?

 

 

QUESTION ID: 2179

1. Annular ligament
2. Lateral ulna collateral ligament
3. Medial collateral ligament
4. Radial collateral ligament
5. Radial head

QUESTION 2 OF 3

A right-handed 12-year-old gymnast presents with insidious loss of elbow extension.
Where is the typical finding located?

QUESTION ID: 2180

1. Left capitellum
2. Left radial head
3. Left trochlea
4. Right capitellum
5. Right trochlea

QUESTION 3 OF 3

Whilst working out in the gym, a patient feels a pop in their elbow and notices bruising on the medial forearm.
A structure is repaired through a single incision approach, which deficit will be seen if the most commonly involved nerve is injured?

QUESTION ID: 2223

1. Altered/absent sensation in first dorsal web space
2. Altered/absent sensation volar lateral forearm
3. Altered/absent sensation volar medial forearm
4. Weakness/inability to extend fingers
5. Weakness/inability to flex thumb IPJ